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Paul Ezzo

EzzoAssistant Professor
Department of Biomedical Sciences
Member of the GSBS Faculty

3302 Gaston Ave.
Dallas, Texas 75246
Phone: 214-828-8992
Fax: 214-874-4538
Email: pezzo@bcd.tamhsc.edu

Education and Post-Graduate Training

Postdoctoral Fellowship, Medical and Dental Microbiology Laboratory, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (1993-1999)

Ph.D., Microbiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (2000)

Specialty training in Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (2000)

D.D.S., Baylor College of Dentistry (1993)

B.S., Biology, University of Texas at Austin (1989)

Career History

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry (1999-present)

Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Periodontics, Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry (2001-present)

Instructor, Undergraduate Periodontal Surgery Clinic, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (1997)

Teaching Assistant, Medical and Dental Microbiology Laboratory, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (1995)

Teaching Assistant, Medical and Dental Microbiology Laboratory, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (1993)

Teaching Interests

Teaching responsibilities include: 

Microbiology (dental and dental hygiene)

Research Interests

Dr. Paul Ezzo is interested in studying the host response to the periodontal pathogen A. actinomycetemocomitans(Aa).  A complete understanding of the normal host response to this organism must be accomplished in order to develop immune-based therapies that would be protective against Aa infection.  Previously, Dr. Ezzo's research focused on identifying the antigenic determinants of Aa by developing a panel of T cell hybridomas.  Interestingly, over 50% of the panel was reactive to leukotoxin, an important virulence factor made by this microorganism.  These results are the first to show that leukotoxin is an immunodominant protein capable of eliciting a T cell response in mice.

What is presently unclear is the effect that Aa leukotoxin may have on dendritic cells.  Dendritic cells are an important family of cells that enable the host to mount an effective adaptive response against an invading organism like Aa.  Because very little is known about Aa/dendritic cell interactions, the present research focuses on: performing in vitro studies of dendritic cell phenotype and function after co-culture with leukotoxin positive and negative strains of Aa, characterizing in situ the dendritic cell subsets found in gingiva from infected patients before and after clinical treatment, and isolating and characterizing dendritic cells directly from Aa-infected patients.

Recent Grants

     A. actinomycetemocomitans and dendritic cells.  NIH K23 DE00469-01

Selected Publications

  1. Maltezos C, Glickman GN, Ezzo P, He J. Comparison of the sealing of Resilon, Pro Root MTA, and Super-EBA as root-end filling materials: A bacterial leakage study. J Endod 32(4):324-327, 2006.
  2. Ezzo PJ and Cutler CW.  Microorganisms as risk indicators for periodontal disease. Periodontology 2000 32:24-35, 2003.
  3. Kolodrubetz D, Phillips LH, Ezzo PJ, and Kraig E.  Directed genomic integration in Actinobacillus actinomycetemocomitans: Generation of defined leukotoxin-negative mutants.  Infection and Immunity 63(7):2780-4, 1995.
Last edited by: jsantacruz 07/24/2014

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